The Subjective Logic of Hegel Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel

ISBN: 9781230441610

Published:

Paperback

34 pages


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The Subjective Logic of Hegel  by  Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel

The Subjective Logic of Hegel by Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel
| Paperback | PDF, EPUB, FB2, DjVu, talking book, mp3, RTF | 34 pages | ISBN: 9781230441610 | 3.64 Mb

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1855 edition. Excerpt: ... the predicate, itMoreThis historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher.

Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1855 edition. Excerpt: ... the predicate, it follows that every thing is necessarily a judgment realized, since we always find in an individual thing not only its individuality, but also the generality of which it forms a part, that is, the two extremes which constitute a judgment. In other words, in every judgment, the subject, or the individual thing, is elevated to the sphere of its predicate- and the predicate, or the general, in its turn is brought into existence, or realized in the subject. The characteristic object, then, of every judgment is to make each thing appear under its twofold aspect, or as being at once individual in itself, and general in its relation to the idea.

Can it be believed that logicians have never remarked that every judgment expresses that some special or individual thing taken as subject is some generality taken as predicate ? But if this be so, we shall have to acknowledge that an enunciation which describes an individual thing by simply enumerating some of the characteristic qualities which would serve to make it known, without expressing any generality, does not constitute a judgment--and so it is.

When we say, Aristotle died, in the fourth year of the Qoth Olympiad, aged sixty-three years- or, Gossar was born at Rome- he carried on war against the Gauls for ten years, and crossed the Rubicon, &c.- such enunciations do not constitute a judgment- and it is strange to see logicians giving themselves infinite trouble, and transcribing such sentences as these in a thousand ways, in order to get out of them something resembling a judgment.

They even fancy themselves obliged to take to pieces, and to distort in some way or other into the form of a judgment such phrases as these: I have slept well- take up arms- a carriage is...



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